In March 1896, disillusioned by rinderpest which had not only decimated their herds of cattle but had also given the authoririties a reason to cull healthy livestock, and equally by perceived 'mismanagement' at the hands of those of their brethren who had become policemen of the settlers, the amaNdebele rose in rebellion against the white settlers. Impis massacred white men, women and children on isolated farms and mines. 


A few months later, the Mashona also took up arms, encouraged and emboldened by the act their traditional foes, the amaNdebele, to the south. Empire and colonial troops would eventually be brought in to supress the rebellions, in actions and campaigns which ensured that men like Baden-Powell, Spreckley and Plumer would always be remembered.

The Rhodesian Soldier